Earliest Computer Mouse

The trackball (also known as the computer mouse) a related pointing device, was invented in 1941 by Ralph Benjamin as part of a post-World War II-era fire-control radar plotting system called Comprehensive Display System. Benjamin was then working for the British Royal Navy Scientific Service. Benjamin's project used analog computers to calculate the future position of target aircraft based on several initial input points provided by a user with a joystick. Benjamin felt that a more elegant input device was needed and invented a ball tracker called "roller ball", for this purpose.
The trackball used four disks to pick up motion, two each for the X and Y directions. Several rollers provided mechanical support. When the ball was rolled, the pickup discs spun and contacts on their outer rim made periodic contact with wires, producing pulses of output with each movement of the ball. By counting the pulses, the physical movement of the ball could be determined. A digital computer calculated the tracks, and sent the resulting data to other ships in a task force using pulse-code modulation radio signals.


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1st Computer Mouse


Operation

A mouse typically controls the motion of a pointer in two dimensions in a graphical user interface .The mouse turns movements of the hand backward and forward, left and right into equivalent electronic signals that in turn are used to move the pointer.The relative movements of the mouse on the surface are applied to the position of the pointer on the screen, which signals the point where actions of the user take place, so that the hand movements are replicated by the pointer.Clicking or hovering can select files, programs or actions from a list of names, or through small images called "icons" and other elements. For example, a text file might be represented by a picture of a paper notebook, and clicking while the cursor hovers this icon might cause a text editing program to open the file in a window.


Video on the first computer mouse

Webpage: 1st Computer Mouse
Webpage: Time Line of Computer Mouse